Social Anthropology; Southern Memories

DSC_3414Travel pictures should tell a story, depict something unique about a location or evoke a memory. Sometimes, pictures of very ordinary subjects will tell more than images of traditional themes.

I happened across this location quite by accident and it immediately evoked memories of my childhood in rural North Carolina. In the south, outside laundromats were not uncommon. ┬áMany people did not have an automatic washer at home; those that did often didn’t have a dryer. I guess the fact that they were left open to the elements was a reflection of the local climate. Winters were fairly mild and summers could be uncomfortably hot, thus the need for good ventilation in the absence of air conditioning. While my family was lucky enough to have both a washer and dryer at home, the sight of an outside laundromat still reminds me of home.

Travel Pic of the Day: Name That Building

ISO 250, f/7.1, exposure 1/60 sec, time 3:15pm

ISO 250, f/7.1, exposure 1/60 sec, time 3:15pm

So, let’s try something different today. Kudos and big thumbs up to the first person to correctly identify this historic building. While the graffiti doesn’t help the look, this unassuming building played a HUGE roll in history and may have even affected your life. Name the building.

Capturing a Little Local Color in Ybor City

Ybor City MuralPhotographing local artwork is a great way to capture the essence of a city or specific area. This image shows a close-up section of a mural along 7th Avenue in historic Ybor City, Florida. I love the vibrant colors and how the iconography in the painting depicts many cultural aspects of the area.

When you’re looking for interesting subject matter for your travel images, don’t overlook artwork that conveys something about the location.

Some Travel Pictures Just Beg For an Explanation

Mind The GapI took this picture in a tube station in London. “Mind the Gap” is a common warning posted throughout the underground system and blasted from audio speakers continuously. Although I understand the purpose of the warning, I could never figure out why every-other sign is mounted upside-down. One local suggested that it was so the sign could be read if you fall onto the tracks. Hopefully, he was just joking.